, , ,

Ford recalls 29,300 Ranger pickups in Canada for airbag fault

Takata airbag recalls to grow as U.S. regulator takes over recall proces

Recall of about 391,000 Ranger pickups, including 29,334 in Canada announced: the driver’s airbag inflators can explode with too much force and cause injuries.

Ford Ranger pickup trucks are being recalled after another death related to exploding Takata airbags. (David Zalubowski/Associated Press)

The recall covers trucks from the 2004 through 2006 model years in the U.S. and Canada.

Read more about it, here:
http://www.cbc.ca/news/business/ford-recalls-29-300-ranger-pickups-in-canada-for-airbag-fault-1.3420414

Manufacturers must have quality control systems in place to prevent defective products from entering the market. They also need to provide adequate directions and warning labels to protect consumers.

When a dangerous or defective product injures an unwary consumer, one or more of the manufacturer, designer, distributor, wholesaler or retailer will be considered legally liable as long as the consumer was using the product as it was meant to be used when he or she was injured.

Strype Injury Lawyers is experienced in helping determine who bears responsibility for product or manufacturing defects or inadequate warnings and information and then pursuing those responsible for the damages that their negligence has caused consumers.

In the light of recent massive auto industry product recalls and resulting lawsuits, Strype Injury Lawyers is ready to pursue those responsible for the damages that their negligence has caused you.

,

Driverless Cars: 2 Interesting Articles

Driverless Cars: Poll Finds Canadians Almost Evenly Split On Issue

This driverless Mercedes concept car was spotted on the streets of California in 2015. (Photo: Daimler AG)

If there was still any doubt that driverless cars are happening, the news coming out of the world’s automakers this week ought to put it to rest.
Kanetix commissioned a poll to find out whether Canadians are ready to give up driving and jump into the driverless car world. The poll found Canadians are about as undecided on the issue, collectively, as you can be on any issue.

Read more about it in this Huffington Post article:
http://www.huffingtonpost.ca/2016/01/09/driverless-car-poll-canada_n_8940228.html

Here’s a quote from another interesting article on the subject of driverless cars and related ethical questions:

“The year is 2035. The world’s population is 9 billion. The polar ice caps have totally melted and Saudi Arabia has run out of oil. Will Smith is battling murderous robots. Matt Damon is stranded on Mars. Dippin’ Dots is finally the ice cream of the present.

You’re humming along in your self-driving car, chatting on your iPhone 37 while the machine navigates on its own. Then a swarm of people appears in the street, right in the path of the oncoming vehicle.

There’s a calculation to be made — avoid the crowd and crash the owner, or stay on track and take many lives — and no one is at the wheel to make it. Except, of course, the car itself.”

Read the whole article, here:
http://www.huffingtonpost.ca/2016/01/09/driverless-car-poll-canada_n_8940228.html

Manufacturers must have quality control systems in place to prevent defective products from entering the market. They also need to provide adequate directions and warning labels to protect consumers.

When a dangerous or defective product injures an unwary consumer, one or more of the manufacturer, designer, distributor, wholesaler or retailer will be considered legally liable as long as the consumer was using the product as it was meant to be used when he or she was injured.

Strype Injury Lawyers is experienced in helping determine who bears responsibility for product or manufacturing defects or inadequate warnings and information and then pursuing those responsible for the damages that their negligence has caused consumers.