PERSONAL INJURY BLOG: Product Liability

Product liability: faulty product

Product liability: When a dangerous or defective product injures an unwary consumer, one or more of the manufacturer, designer, distributor, wholesaler or retailer will be considered legally liable as long as the consumer was using the product as it was meant to be used when he or she was injured.

Exploding Sunroofs

Exploding sunroofs: an event that has happened in Canada hundreds of times in recent years, according to government statistics. Transport Canada has recorded 351 complaints about shattering sunroofs since the year 2000. The number of such complaints rose to 110 in 2017 from zero in 2007, as reported by Global News.

Whether the product is a faulty automobile airbag, hairdryer, a child’s toy, tainted meat, artificial hip, or an automobile tire, manufacturers must ensure that products are designed and made safely.

Manufacturers must have quality control systems in place to prevent defective products from entering the market. They also need to provide adequate directions and warning labels to protect consumers. Strype Injury Lawyers handles cases of Manufacturing and Product Liability.

“An exploding sunroof might sound like a freak occurrence, but a Consumer Reports investigation has found that it’s not. These incidents have happened in every month of the year in every part of the country, in vehicles from all over the world; they have occurred on interstates, on country roads, and even while parked in driveways.

Sunroofs have significantly expanded in size in recent years, and they’ve also grown in popularity. And the number of consumer complaints about them shattering without warning has soared.

While this doesn’t happen nearly as often as, say, a tire blowout on the highway, any explosion while driving can present a real safety hazard.

And although the issue is well known to the auto industry and government safety regulators, drivers generally assume that their sunroofs are safe.” Read more about this here: https://www.consumerreports.org/car-safety/exploding-sunroofs-danger-overhead/

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Automakers knew Takata airbags were dangerous

Attorneys for people suing Takata air bags maker and five automakers say the car companies knew that Takata’s products were dangerous yet continued to use them for years because they were inexpensive.

The allegations against Honda, Toyota, Nissan, Ford and BMW were made in a court filing Monday in Miami. The federal court there is handling pretrial evidence-gathering in dozens of lawsuits against Takata and the automakers. The filing says the allegations are partly based on auto company documents.”

The penalties include $850 million in restitution to automakers, $125 million for victims and families and a $25-million criminal fine.

Separately, three former executives are charged with falsifying test reports. They remain in Japan.

Takata’s inflators use ammonium nitrate to create a small explosion that inflates airbags in a crash. But when exposed to prolonged high temperatures and humidity, the chemical can deteriorate and burn too fast. That can blow apart a metal canister.

Read the full article about Takata air bags by:

Each day we work with people whose lives and families have been destroyed by the negligence of others. With more than 55 years of experience, Strype Injury Lawyers has built a reputation for legal excellence and client advocacy. Our approach is simple: if a reasonable out-of-court settlement can’t be reached, we will take your case to court and litigate to obtain fair compensation.

Read Strype client testionials, here.

Strype Injury Lawyers, Toronto’s manufacturing liability law firm: Whether the product is a faulty automobile airbag, hairdryer, a child’s toy, tainted meat, artificial hip, or an automobile tire, manufacturers must ensure that products are designed and made safely.

Manufacturers must have quality control systems in place to prevent defective products from entering the market. They also need to provide adequate directions and warning labels to protect consumers.

Read more about Manufacturing and Product Liability, here.

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Video game injuries: Pokémon Go and Pedestrian Safety

Historically, when individuals think about video game injuries they may be thinking of carpal tunnel syndrome, eye strain or possible fatigue, as gamers play for hours on end in the comfort of their own homes. However, with the recent launch of Pokémon Go into Canada, gamers, pedestrians and motorists alike, need to be aware of the increased caution that is needed on roadways as more people immerse themselves in the virtual world, while physically walking around in the real world.

Pokémon Go was released in Canada on July 17, 2016 and is a free-to-play, location based, augmented reality game developed by Niantic for IOS and Android devices. In the game, players use the smart device’s GPS and camera to capture, battle, and train one of the 151 virtual creatures, called Pokémon, that appear on the screen as if they were in the same real-world location as the player. As players travel around the real world, their avatar moves along with them on the game’s map. Players must physically travel to explore the game’s map, capture Pokémon, visit PokéStops to collect needed resources for your Pokémon trainer, or gyms, to battle other players and test their skills.

Sensor Tower, a group that analyzes mobile apps earlier estimated that the game is the fastest ever to reach 50 million global downloads across iOS and Android devices and now estimates that the game has crossed the 75 million download milestone earlier this week.

The share price of Nintendo Co., Ltd rose dramatically after the initial launch on July 6th, 2016, from $17.63 to an intra-day 52-week high on July 18th, 2016 at $38.25. The share price has since fallen back to about $29 on the date this article was written. Nintendo now sits at a market capitalization of around $36.74 Billion.

Within Toronto, pedestrian and road safety is an upmost concern for motorists and residents of the city. As of July 14, 2016, total pedestrian and cyclist deaths within Toronto for this year have reached 23. With the addition of games such as Pokémon Go, gamers, pedestrians and motorists should take extra care, to avoid contributing further to this rise in deaths.

For Gamers

1. Remember to be alert at all times, be aware of your surroundings. This is also the splash screen message within Pokémon Go as the app opens, which can be applied to both awareness to capture Pokémon and player’s safety as they travel around the real world.

2. Common sense. There have already been numerous reports of accidents related to video game injuries – players playing Pokémon Go – as people walk into revolving doors, trees, or not being fully aware when crossing a street, leading to personal injuries.

3. Avoid Trespassing and show respect. In the quest for Pokémon, players have also been trespassing into restricted areas or places where they could be hurt, or hurt by others present at these locations. Some of these places include, courtrooms, hospitals, and residential homes. Players should avoid trespassing into these areas, and allow clients, patients and homeowners their privacy.

For Pedestrians

1. Awareness of others. If you are not playing Pokémon Go, be aware that others might be or are being simply distracted in some other way. This may result in pedestrians, abruptly stopping on the sidewalk, road, or while crossing a street.

2. Any handheld device. When using any handheld device be aware when stepping away from curbs and on to the street as these devices may lead to distraction. As the saying goes, “look both ways before crossing the street”.

For Motorists

1. Avoid playing Pokémon Go while driving. This may seem like common sense. However, there have already been accidents related to players driving while trying to capture a Pokémon. Avoiding playing while driving will improve the overall road safety for yourself and others.

2. Awareness of others. Be aware that in high-density pedestrian areas some people may make unexpected movements or not be fully aware of the real-world dangers that are present as they walk into the street or into a parking lot.

While the weather is nice this summer, more and more people will be out trying to catch them all. Remember when playing Pokémon Go, be respectful, be aware of your surroundings and be safe! As the saying goes, “the life you save may be your own”.

Links to Other Articles
For more information on Pokémon Go, see the links below:

https://techcrunch.com/2016/07/11/pokemon-go-adds-9b-to-nintendos-value-global-rollout-continues-this-week/

http://www.gamespot.com/articles/pokemon-go-estimated-to-have-been-downloaded-75-mi/1100-6442180/

For more information on pedestrian and cyclist deaths within Toronto, see the link below:

http://www.metronews.ca/news/toronto/2016/02/04/pedestrian-and-cyclist-fatalities-in-toronto-2016.html

Feel free to contact  Strype Injury Lawyers and we would be happy to answer any questions you may have regarding issues arising from this new wave of entertainment and possible video game injuries.

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Self-Driving Car Accident: First Driver Death

Authorities investigate first driver death in self-driving car accident. A fatal collision involving a self-driving car has been recorded in Florida.

“WASHINGTON — The first American death involving a car in self-driving mode presents a dilemma: How aggressively to embrace the potentially life-saving technology after a fatal crash.”

The driver, Joshua D. Brown, a 40-year-old technology company owner from Canton, Ohio, was so enamored of his sedan that he nicknamed it “Tessy” and praised the Autopilot’s safety benefits. Brown published videos on Youtube of himself behind the wheel with the system active.

He was killed May 7 in Williston, Florida, when his car’s cameras failed to distinguish the white side of a turning tractor-trailer from a brightly lit sky and didn’t automatically activate the brakes, according to statements by the government and the automaker. Brown didn’t take control and brake, either.

Read the full article here:
http://www.nola.com/traffic/index.ssf/2016/07/driver_killed_in_self-driving.html

Wrongful death claims occur when someone is killed as a result of the negligence of others. Strype Injury Law works to obtain compensation to ease the financial burden resulting from the loss of a loved one.

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Structure Collapse Accidents

Structure Collapse Accidents in the News: building, scaffolding, roof, stage, balcony railing, falling glass, …

When structures are not built to code or properly maintained, they can collapse resulting in serious injuries and even death.

A building collapse, recently, in midtown Toronto has sent six people and one infant to hospital with serious but non-life-threatening injuries. The façade of the building toppled onto Eglinton Avenue West during demolition work related to the Crosstown light-rail transit (LRT) project.

Here are some examples of structural collapse accidents to be found in news reports:

…”On June 23, 2012, part of the upper parking structure of the Algo Centre Mall in Elliot Lake Ontario collapsed causing, as alleged in the Plaintiffs’ claim, personal injury and property damage.”

…”Construction project manager Vadim Kazenelson has been sentenced to 3½ years in prison for his role in a scaffolding collapse at a Toronto apartment building that left four workers dead on Christmas Eve 2009.”

… “The collapse at Downsview Park crushed one of Radiohead’s technicians to death and injured three others with the band. This isn’t the first time an outdoor stage at a Canadian concert has collapsed, sometimes with fatal consequences. Several people were hurt last July when the stage at Ottawa’s Bluesfest collapsed as Cheap Trick playing. In 2009, the main stage collapsed at Alberta’s Big Valley Jamboree, near Camrose, killing one woman and injured several others.”

If you or a loved one is suffering due to an injury sustained in structure collapse accidents, you may be entitled to compensation for your injuries. Strype Injury Lawyers can help. We represent people and families who have suffered catastrophic injuries or wrongful death due to the negligence of others.

STRYPE is committed to diligently supporting and advocating for our clients, maintaining strong communication and helping you cope with dignity and compassion during an undeniably challenging period. Rest assured, your future is in good hands.

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Ford recalls 29,300 Ranger pickups in Canada for airbag fault

Takata airbag recalls to grow as U.S. regulator takes over recall proces

Recall of about 391,000 Ranger pickups, including 29,334 in Canada announced: the driver’s airbag inflators can explode with too much force and cause injuries.

Ford Ranger pickup trucks are being recalled after another death related to exploding Takata airbags. (David Zalubowski/Associated Press)

The recall covers trucks from the 2004 through 2006 model years in the U.S. and Canada.

Read more about it, here:
http://www.cbc.ca/news/business/ford-recalls-29-300-ranger-pickups-in-canada-for-airbag-fault-1.3420414

Manufacturers must have quality control systems in place to prevent defective products from entering the market. They also need to provide adequate directions and warning labels to protect consumers.

When a dangerous or defective product injures an unwary consumer, one or more of the manufacturer, designer, distributor, wholesaler or retailer will be considered legally liable as long as the consumer was using the product as it was meant to be used when he or she was injured.

Strype Injury Lawyers is experienced in helping determine who bears responsibility for product or manufacturing defects or inadequate warnings and information and then pursuing those responsible for the damages that their negligence has caused consumers.

In the light of recent massive auto industry product recalls and resulting lawsuits, Strype Injury Lawyers is ready to pursue those responsible for the damages that their negligence has caused you.

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Driverless Cars: 2 Interesting Articles

Driverless Cars: Poll Finds Canadians Almost Evenly Split On Issue

This driverless Mercedes concept car was spotted on the streets of California in 2015. (Photo: Daimler AG)

If there was still any doubt that driverless cars are happening, the news coming out of the world’s automakers this week ought to put it to rest.
Kanetix commissioned a poll to find out whether Canadians are ready to give up driving and jump into the driverless car world. The poll found Canadians are about as undecided on the issue, collectively, as you can be on any issue.

Read more about it in this Huffington Post article:
http://www.huffingtonpost.ca/2016/01/09/driverless-car-poll-canada_n_8940228.html

Here’s a quote from another interesting article on the subject of driverless cars and related ethical questions:

“The year is 2035. The world’s population is 9 billion. The polar ice caps have totally melted and Saudi Arabia has run out of oil. Will Smith is battling murderous robots. Matt Damon is stranded on Mars. Dippin’ Dots is finally the ice cream of the present.

You’re humming along in your self-driving car, chatting on your iPhone 37 while the machine navigates on its own. Then a swarm of people appears in the street, right in the path of the oncoming vehicle.

There’s a calculation to be made — avoid the crowd and crash the owner, or stay on track and take many lives — and no one is at the wheel to make it. Except, of course, the car itself.”

Read the whole article, here:
http://www.huffingtonpost.ca/2016/01/09/driverless-car-poll-canada_n_8940228.html

Manufacturers must have quality control systems in place to prevent defective products from entering the market. They also need to provide adequate directions and warning labels to protect consumers.

When a dangerous or defective product injures an unwary consumer, one or more of the manufacturer, designer, distributor, wholesaler or retailer will be considered legally liable as long as the consumer was using the product as it was meant to be used when he or she was injured.

Strype Injury Lawyers is experienced in helping determine who bears responsibility for product or manufacturing defects or inadequate warnings and information and then pursuing those responsible for the damages that their negligence has caused consumers.

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Teen driver’s death linked to Takata air bag problems

A teen driver who died a few days after a July car crash near Pittsburgh has been tentatively identified by the government as the eighth death in the U.S. due to an explosive air bag inflator made by auto parts maker Takata, federal transportation officials said Wednesday.

Although yet to be confirmed by the manufacturer, the 8th incident involved a model year 2001 vehicle that spent most of it service life in the high absolute humidity (HAH) region and had been under recall for many years.

Read whole article.

For Takata recalls in Canada, please follow this link:
https://www.tc.gc.ca/eng/motorvehiclesafety/safevehicles-defectinvestigations-1433.html

Strype Injury Lawyers: Whether the product is a faulty automobile airbag, hairdryer, a child’s toy, tainted meat, artificial hip, or an automobile tire, manufacturers must ensure that products are designed and made safely.

Manufacturers must have quality control systems in place to prevent defective products from entering the market. They also need to provide adequate directions and warning labels to protect consumers.

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Takata Recalls in Canada

Takata airbags: About 1.5 million recalls listed in Canada

Number of recalls grows as manufacturers list cars that need defective airbags replaced

So far 1.95 million cars have been recalled in Canada to replace Takata airbags. (Duane Burleson/Associated Press).

To read full article, click on the link, below.
http://www.cbc.ca/news/business/takata-airbags-about-1-5-million-recalls-listed-in-canada-1.3091109

For information on car models involved, click on following link.
http://www.tc.gc.ca/eng/motorvehiclesafety/safevehicles-defectinvestigations-1433.html

Manufacturers must have quality control systems in place to prevent defective products from entering the market. They also need to provide adequate directions and warning labels to protect consumers.

When a dangerous or defective product injures an unwary consumer, one or more of the manufacturer, designer, distributor, wholesaler or retailer will be considered legally liable as long as the consumer was using the product as it was meant to be used when he or she was injured.

Strype Barristers LLP is experienced in helping determine who bears responsibility for product or manufacturing defects or inadequate warnings and information and then pursuing those responsible for the damages that their negligence has caused consumers.

In the light of recent massive auto industry product recalls and resulting lawsuits, Strype Barristers is ready to pursue those responsible for the damages that their negligence has caused you.